Unique Traits of Mompreneurs

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Mother’s Day is right around the corner – May 10th to be exact. To prepare you for this special day, In Her Shoes is giving you an up-close-and-personal look at the amazing and oftentimes under-appreciated, mompreneur. Mom business owners are different from other entrepreneurs in many ways. For one, it’s motherhood that inspires them! Mother and Entrepreneur.com contributor, Lisa Druxman, spills the beans on how and why mompreneurs do what they do:

Where we find inspiration: Many women who never would have thought of themselves as entrepreneurs are startled by the ideas that motherhood spurs. You realize all kinds of needs aren’t being met and constantly think there must be a better way. One mompreneur, Tamara Monosoff, has created an entire business to help mom inventors achieve their dreams. But frequently, it’s not a product that inspires mompreneurship–it’s motherhood itself. For instance, the drive and desire to be home with their children motivates some moms to create businesses that fit in with their family lives. They may start businesses that have nothing to do with motherhood but that give them the opportunity to work from home or work nontraditional hours.

How we work: First off, there is no blanket generalization for mompreneurs. I know some who work a few hours a day and others who have worked diligently to create an empire. But most of those I interview tell me they’re mompreneurs so they can call their own shots. Most shy away from traditional 9-to-5 hours. They work during the fringe hours of the day so they can spend precious time with their kids. They work from wireless laptops while watching their kids in karate class. And they keep in touch via their smart phone wherever motherhood may take them.

I have yet to meet a mompreneur who hasn’t said it’s the hardest she’s ever worked in her life. But the good news is that every woman also says she wouldn’t trade it for the world. Mompreneurs truly are working 24 hours a day. When they’re not working, they’re thinking about work. When they are working, they’re thinking about being with their kids. It’s a full life, and each woman accomplishes it in her own way.

Where we work: Most mompreneurs I encounter work from home (or at least start out that way). They spare themselves the commute to the office, and they don’t have to get baby-sitters when their babies are at home napping. Offices have gone virtual. You’ll see mompreneurs working at Starbucks, local libraries and even on park benches. As long as they have cell phones and laptops, they’re in business. New business ideas are emerging, such as Cubes and Crayons, which combine child care and office space, giving moms an opportunity to work and take good care of their kids. Some mompreneurs start companies with child-friendly offices or provide day care.

Why we work: There are many reasons mompreneurs go into business. Some want to bring in a little extra money. Some want to have something stimulating and rewarding they can do beyond motherhood. And others want to see a change in the world. While some mompreneurs do experience huge financial success, most don’t go into business expecting it. That is very different from the mindset of most traditional entrepreneurs. More and more moms are starting their own businesses. I love that more and more women are realizing they can fulfill their dreams and still be successful moms.

Kudos go out to a few of the mompreneurs I know and respect: Latisha Daring of Pieces Boutique, Carla Sewell Bluitt of Unique Marketing Tools, Karen Tappin Saunderson of Karen’s Body Beautiful, and Jodie Becker of GEORGIA.

Are you a mompreneur or were you raised by one? If so, I’d love for you to weigh in!

Source: Entrepreneur.com

As a New York City beauty PR strategist, Renae Bluitt created "In Her Shoes" to empower and enlighten women committed to realizing their dreams.

Tiffany-J says:

The best thing about mompreneurs is that by having their own companies they are instilling drive, hardwork, dedication, and self-confidence in their children.
Kudos to all who make it work!

Carla says:

Thanks for the shout out, lady:)